Tag holidays

Note to Marketers: Holidays Help Connect Us to Others… and Every Day Is a Holiday

Photo credit: Qfamily on Flickr.The idea of creating a marketing campaign that is focused on a holiday is nothing new.

Businesses have been doing this for years.

They do it because it works.

Part of the reason why it works is because people often want to feel a connection to the world around them, and holidays tap into that need.

In a 2013 post on the Everyday Sociology Blog, Dr. Karen Sternheimer, sociologist at the University of Southern California, points out that the rituals associated with the end-of-year holiday season help us feel connected to the rest of society.

As she writes, “Sociologist Emile Durkheim saw rituals as a form of social glue, holding societies together. Shared experiences, like religious and secular celebrations may help create a feeling of commonality. As sociologist Diana Kendall discusses in her book Framing Class, during the holidays media coverage tends to highlight giving to the less fortunate more than other times of year. She found that news stories tend to be more sympathetic and less critical of the poor, highlighting their humanity and stressing our common bonds.”

“Whether the rituals are gift giving, religious worship, or other cultural practices, they serve to unite us with the people we celebrate them with,” she continues. “Wishing strangers “Happy Holidays,” “Merry Christmas,” or “Happy New Year,” extends these bonds beyond our immediate social group.”

Every Day Is a Holiday

While Dr. Sternheimer was talking about the end-of-year holiday season, this enhanced feeling of connection to others as a result of celebrating holidays can happen during any time of the year.

And, marketers are in luck, as there are many reasons to celebrate all year long.

In fact, as you will find with a quick Google search, every day is a holiday.

Sure, you might think that many of these obscure holidays seem hokey or just plain made up. And, it’s okay to think that because many of them are.

In fact, many of these holidays were made up by the man who founded the Foodimentary website.

However, people often celebrate these made-up holidays.

Peeps Aren’t Just for Easter

In an effort to expand their sales beyond the Easter season, Peeps, the brand of marshmallow candies that is over six decades old, introduced Peeps Minis with a marketing campaign that attempted to link the brand to some of the more quirky and obscure holidays.

According to a 2014 New York Times article, “Todd Condie, a copywriter with the Terri & Sandy Solution, said the concept for the campaign sprang from the idea that Peeps were associated with special occasions.”

“What we kept coming back to was that what really defined Peeps as a product was the fact that it was associated with special times, so we tried to figure out what made every day special,” Mr. Condie is quoted as saying in the article. “And it set us off into this world of weird, quirky holidays that really fit the quirky nature of the Peeps brand.”

Fast forward two years and it looks like Peeps Minis did not go over so well.

However, if you visit their Twitter page or any of their other social media accounts, you will notice that the people in charge of marketing Peeps haven’t abandoned the idea of using holidays to sell their tasty treats.

Using Holidays to Fuel Your Social Media Marketing Campaigns

Given the fact that holidays tend to make us feel more connected to each other, it makes sense that brands use holidays in their social media marketing campaigns, as social media is all about connecting and sharing with others.

Therefore, it’s not surprising that in the Market Motive/Simplilearn Advanced Social Media Certification Training, Jennifer Cario, President of SugarSpun Marketing and Author of Pinterest Marketing: An Hour a Day, suggests incorporating holidays into a business’s content mix to catch the attention of current and potential customers.

As she states, “Do you have some type of holiday tie-in? If you sell GPSs, can you do something around Columbus Day that’s got some humor to it? Do you want to push your specific candy as the perfect topper on National Ice Cream Day? There are legions of websites out there that list every single sub-holiday that exists.”

“National Tweed Day and, again, National Ice Cream Day, and Share a Hug Day,” she continues. “There’s millions of those, and there’s the opportunity to produce content around all of them. Then to creatively use some promotion and some viralized concepts and feeding things out to influencers to get people talking just based off the excuse of what’s basically a made up holiday.”

“But, again, if it gets people interested, and it catches their attention, it can be a fun way to put some content together,” says Cario.

Final Thoughts

As Dr. Karen Sternheimer pointed out, the rituals associated with holidays unite us with others and extend bonds beyond our immediate social groups.

This is something that brands have taken advantage of when creating marketing and advertising campaigns over the years.

As experts have pointed out, marketers don’t need to wait until the next big holiday to tap into the positive feelings associated with the major holidays sprinkled throughout the year, because every day is a holiday.

In fact, there is a holiday for just about everything.

While some of the holidays seem a bit hokey or contrived, that’s okay.

If celebrating the holiday fits the brand’s image, creating content built around the holiday can still create the sense of unity.

This will help connect the brand with current and potential and customers in a light-hearted way that will likely be a welcome distraction given some of the more heavy and somber issues that people need to deal with in their everyday lives.

Photo credit: Qfamily on Flickr.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

More Posts

‘Tis the Season for Giving Gift Cards – The Gift of Drinking, Dining, or Shopping

Photo credit: tales of a wandering youkai on Flickr.According to a survey conducted by the National Retail Federation (NRF) in the first week of December of 2015, at the time the data was collected over nine in 10 consumers had yet to complete their holiday gift shopping. In fact, about eight percent said that they would not purchase their final gift until Christmas Eve, with another six percent waiting to purchase their final holiday gifts on or after Christmas.

For many consumers, this means stopping in at a favorite restaurant or store to pick up a gift card for someone on their shopping list.

With this in mind, many experts offer suggestions for consumers and retailers alike.

“After years of exchanging gift cards over the holiday season, consumers may want to try to avoid the potential awkward exchange when the card they’ve given their loved ones are worth less or more than the one they’ve received,” says Pam Goodfellow, Principal Analyst at Prosper Insights and Analytics, in an article on the NRF website. “However, there will always be an appetite for gift cards, especially with procrastinators who will wrap up their shopping in the final hours.”

Why This Is Important to Retailers

As we enter the last few days before Christmas, many shoppers will be heading to stores to make their final purchases. However, there inevitably will be some people on the consumer’s shopping list who are particularly hard to buy for.

This makes for the perfect opportunity for stores and restaurants to suggestive sell gift cards.

Not only do gift cards keep the retailer top-of-mind when consumers open their gifts on Christmas morning, it also gives them a reason to visit the store the week after Christmas.

“For retailers and consumers alike, the holiday season doesn’t end on December 25,” reports Kathy Grannis Allen in an article on the NRF website. “In fact, for many consumers the week after Christmas is more than just an opportunity to exchange that sweater from grandma. According to the survey, two-thirds (65.9%) of holiday shoppers said they are planning to shop – both browsing and buying – retailers’ after-Christmas sales. Specifically, 47.2 percent of shoppers said they would shop at a store and 43.1 percent will shop online that week. Nearly six in 10 millennials (18-24 year olds) will shop that week, both in stores (59.2%) and online (59.3%).”

According to the NRF, when consumers were asked when they would use the gift cards that they receive during the holidays, about one in five said that they would use it as quickly as they could. Another 42% said that they would watch for really good sales or promotions to maximize the value of the gift card. That means that if the after-Christmas sales are good enough, it could temp consumers into stores to use their gift cards.

The Gift of Shopping

Many retail experts are pointing out that experiential gifts (e.g., tickets to sporting events, concert tickets, a weekend getaway, etc.) are very popular this year. It could be argued that gift cards fit into this category.

If you think about it, a gift card to a restaurant or movie theatre is the same as buying actual tickets to an event. And, for people who love to shop, a gift card to a store could also be valued for the experience as much as the actual product that the consumer buys with it.

In their book, “Gen Buy: How Tweens, Teens, and Twenty-Somethings are Revolutionizing Retail,” Dr. Kit Yarrow and Jayne O’Donnell write, “As we’ve noted before, gift cards not only guarantee that just the right gift will ultimately be acquired, but they also provide the “gift of shopping.” Shopping with permission to buy in the form of prepayment is way more fun than shopping just to see what’s out there and to socialize.”

Therefore, it is no surprise that gift cards still remain the most requested holiday gift this year.

Counterpoint: Gift Cards Lack Personalization and Surprise

It needs to be noted that retailers might want to try to help the consumer pick out the perfect gift for their loved ones before suggesting the purchase of a gift card.

As Dr. Kit Yarrow points out in an article on Time.com, “While gift cards and wish list picks are never going to land in the worst gift ever category, there’s something missing in the transaction: relationship-fortifying thoughtfulness and the emotional boost that accompanies surprise.”

Final Thoughts

With only a few shopping days left before Christmas, many shoppers are going to be out and about looking to purchase the final items on their holiday shopping lists.

While helping the consumer find the perfect gift should be the first priority, suggestive selling gift cards is an excellent way to get consumers back into stores in the weeks following Christmas.

Furthermore, with experiential gifts becoming more popular, a gift card can actually be the perfect gift if the recipient is a movie lover or a huge fan of a particular bar or restaurant. And, if the person who the gift is for loves to shop, the “gift of shopping” might actually be the best gift that they could receive this year.

Photo credit: tales of a wandering youkai on Flickr.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

More Posts

An Early and Online 2015 Holiday Shopping Season – Why REI Closing on Black Friday Is Good Business

Photo credit: Chris Phan on Flickr.The business world was buzzing this week about REI’s decision to close its brick and mortar stores on one of the busiest shopping days of the year—Black Friday.

While it might have cost them some money in the short term, it was a very savvy business decision for many reasons.

The most obvious reason… all the free publicity REI is getting as business reporters and bloggers attempt to list and defend the company’s possible reasons for this decision.

What follows is a list of some of the factors that the company might have considered before making its announcement on Monday.

Black Friday Sales Are Not the Event That They Once Were

As Nikki Baird points out in an article on Forbes.com, there aren’t many surprise Black Friday deals to be found on Thanksgiving Day thanks to sites like blackfriday.com.

“Shoppers can see the deals way before the day they become available, compare the products, and if they’re enterprising and on the ball, they can find deals just as good or better right now – in fact, there are now price trackers that will help shoppers predict when the price will be the lowest, and apparently that more often happens the Friday before Thanksgiving, not after,” writes Baird.

With this in mind, it is not surprising that The National Retail Federation reported that there was an 11 percent decline in total spending in the four-day period between Thanksgiving Thursday and Sunday in 2014, when compared to the previous year.

It is also interesting to note that according to Google, about one in four consumers who responded to a survey conducted in January of 2015 said they had done some holiday shopping before Halloween last year. If this is true again this year, many consumers are already in stores looking for the best deal on the perfect gift.

Many Shoppers Are Turning to the Internet for Their Holiday Shopping

According to the National Retail Federation, “Almost half of holiday shopping, consisting of browsing and buying, will be done online: average consumers say 46 percent of their shopping (both browsing and buying) this holiday season will be conducted online, up from 44 percent last year.”

An Emphasis on Employees and the Outdoors Resonates With REI’s Customers

In an effort to capture more of a consumer’s holiday budget, many stores are opening earlier and earlier each year. In fact, many retailers will be open in the early evening on Thanksgiving Day.

While people often turn out in droves, many consumers (and retail employees) complain that retailers are missing the point. They feel that the holidays should be reserved for family time, not shopping.

By closing on Black Friday and giving their employees a paid vacation day, REI is sending a message that the family, employee well-being, and getting outdoors during the holiday is important to them, too.

Part of the reason that REI is able to make this unorthodox business decision is that REI is one of the few large retail cooperatives in the nation, not a publicly traded company.

“That basic structure frees up the business to do things that don’t really make sense in conventional market terms,” says Erbin Crowell, executive director for the Neighborhood Foods Co-op Association in a recent Washington Post article.

“Even if an observer called it a marketing strategy, it’s a really intriguing one that points to the fundamental difference between co-ops and traditional public corporations,” says Crowell.

“Clearly they’re seeing their social purpose, their cooperative structure, has value again,” Crowell continues, “and it’s something they want to lift up and share.”

Final Thoughts

REI made a bold move when it decided to announce that its brick and mortar stores will be closed on Black Friday and that employees will receive a paid vacation day in honor of the holiday.

Many factors may have played a role in this decision, including the fact that many consumers have been getting some of their holiday shopping done before Black Friday. In fact, many start before Halloween.

It is also important to point out that while the brick and mortar stores will be closed, customers can still purchase items from REI online.

The free publicity that REI is getting is also an added bonus.

In the end, REI’s management are undoubtedly hoping that this decision will resonate with consumers and create loyal customers who identify with the brand and the values that REI feels are important.

 

Photo credit: Chris Phan on Flickr.

Video credit: CNNMoney on YouTube.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

More Posts

Copyright © chadjthiele.com
Every interaction with a consumer IS marketing.

Built on Notes Blog Core
Powered by WordPress