Category ROI

Using Scent to Make Your Digital Advertising Work Smarter

Photo credit: patchattack on Flickr.As a recent eMarketer article points out, the amount of money that businesses spend on digital advertising is projected to increase dramatically in next few years.

With all this money being spent on digital advertising, businesses hopefully are making the investment in conversion rate optimization (CRO). Otherwise, they are leaving a lot of money on the table.

Even if they don’t take the time to do A/B tests on their websites and landing pages, there are some basic things that businesses can do to increase conversion rates.

Make it Easy for Consumers to Find the Information That They Are Looking For

A good ad will get a consumer to click. Then what?

While there are a lot of things that go into creating the perfect website or landing page, one of the most obvious things that should be done is to ensure that consumers can find the information that made them click in the first place.

This is the basic idea behind the concept of “scent.”

In his Market Motive Conversion Optimization classes, Bryan Eisenberg, co-founder and CMO of IdealSpot, teaches marketers about the importance of scent in digital marketing.

As he points out, if the consumer doesn’t find what they thought they would find when they clicked on the search result or display ad, they are going to abandon the site—thus making a conversion impossible.

There are a lot of things that can break the scent trail, many of which may seem trivial. However, even the smallest detail can make the difference in the conversion process.

As Eisenberg points out in a 2012 blog post, scent issues can include mismatches in language, mixed messaging in offers, and image issues. Even the color scheme can influence the conversion.

And, these are only the issues found on the example mentioned in his blog post.

Final Thoughts

As Bryan Eisenberg points out, there are many things that can be done to increase sales by using the techniques that he teaches in his conversion optimization classes.

One of the simplest and most obvious things that he teaches is to make sure that businesses provide the information on their websites or landing pages that got users to click on the ad in the first place.

However, while it seems obvious, this is a step that marketers often overlook.

There are many, many things that can break the scent trail—too many to cover here.

The point of this post is to introduce the concept of scent to marketers.

This will hopefully lead them to do additional research on the topic, which should lead to better websites and landing pages, and hopefully higher conversion rates. This should lead to increased sales.

Afterall, just increasing the number of digital ads that you use to get people to your website isn’t going to do much if consumers leave your website before converting.

Note: I completed Bryan Eisenberg’s Conversion Optimization training as part of Market Motive’s Digital Marketing Foundations Practitioner Certification training in May of 2015.

Photo credit: patchattack on Flickr.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

More Posts

Not Your Father’s Super Bowl Ads

In recent years, when you tuned in to watch the Super Bowl, you could expect to see some beer commercials, car commercials, an occasional movie trailer, and a GoDaddy commercial or two that featured scantily dressed women who encouraged viewers to host their web sites or register their domain names with GoDaddy.com.

This year, you shouldn’t expect the scantily dressed women—at least from GoDaddy.

Last fall, GoDaddy announced that in 2014 they are going to take their advertisements in a new direction.

According to a press release issued in October of 2013, GoDaddy confirmed that this year’s Super Bowl commercials won’t have the risqué innuendo viewers expect to see in a GoDaddy Super Bowl advertisement.

The press release states that “GoDaddy’s marketing has evolved with the company’s overall transformation under new CEO Blake Irving, who is committed to maintaining GoDaddy’s edge, but in a way that speaks inclusively to the customer base and demonstrates the value the company provides to small businesses and entrepreneurs.”

In other words, GoDaddy is making an effort not to alienate women.

Less Cheesecake Is Good for Business

A recent Adweek article that was written by Kat Gordon points out that Super Bowl ads typically haven’t done a good job reaching female viewers.

According to Gordon, “Sadly, so far the track record of the work has been pretty degrading in their depictions of women. In 2013 we saw waitresses turned strippers, scantily clad women tackling each other in the dirt, and a supermodel sloppily kissing a computer programmer.”

“Those were the major marketing fumbles of the day,” continues Gordon. “Not only were these ads off-putting to women, but many men also tweeted their wish for something other than lowest-common denominator creative. And the old adage that “sex sells” is being refuted with research that says that brand recall dips when the brain is busy processing ta-tas.”

That alone would make some brands take note. However, it is some of the other statistics that Gordon points out that may have caused GoDaddy and other brands to show a little less skin this year.

“According to Nielsen demographic data, 46 percent of the Super Bowl viewing audience is female, and more women watch the game than the Oscars, Grammys and Emmys combined,” writes Gordon. “She-conomy.com reports that women influence the majority of consumer spending across all categories, and onlineMBA.com published a report that found women comprise the majority of Twitter users (59 percent). Finally, women out-tweet men by 60 percent, per a study of 1,000 British Twitter accounts by Brandwatch.”

This points to the fact that female consumers are not only very influential when it comes to making purchase decisions, they are very vocal about it.

This makes the female consumer a force to be reckoned with.

That would explain the fact that this year’s Super Bowl ads are going to feature a lot less cheesecake and a lot more beefcake.

Note: For additional information about what to expect in the 2014 Super Bowl ads, check out this USA Today article.

Final Thoughts

Each year, brands spend millions of dollars to reach consumers during one of the most watched events of the year.

Given the fact that nearly half of the Super Bowl viewers are female and they tend to be the most vocal online, it is not surprising that brands have stopped ignoring this important demographic and started to create ads to meet their expectations and desires.

In 2014, it is important that brands create ads that appeal to both men and women in an effort to maximize their return on investment.

Photo credits: Rocky Mountain High and torbakhopper on Flickr.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

More Posts

Year-End Assessments Aren’t Enough

It’s the time of year when businesses look back at the year that was and evaluate what worked and what didn’t.

This time of year also brings with it predictions for the new year.

While many experts put forth some very good educated guesses about what will work for businesses in the upcoming year, it is important for everyone to keep in mind that what works for most businesses won’t necessarily work for every business.

In fact, businesses that have multiple locations around the country (and the world) might find that what works in one region might not work so well for customers in other geographic regions.

Also, keep in mind that we are living in a time where the business environment is changing so fast that the predictions that experts make might become obsolete days (or even hours) after they are made. (This is particularly true if a new technology is introduced to the market that the experts weren’t aware of or if a vendor is bought out and is subsequently shut down.)

It is therefore of the utmost importance that businesses test and evaluate their business decisions at more frequent intervals and pivot based on what the data is telling them.

It might actually be the case that what they thought would work just doesn’t and that the actual business opportunity might be in another area.

If businesses are only evaluating their results at the end of the calendar or fiscal year, it might be too late.

Photo credit: Bill David Brookson on Flickr.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

More Posts

The Hidden ROI of Social Media Marketing

Photo credit: Usraek on Flickr.As a former survey researcher, I understand the importance of measuring the success of your marketing efforts.

If you don’t have a way to measure how well any given marketing campaign is doing, how do you know whether or not it’s worth the time and effort? And, maybe more important, how are you going to justify its existence to senior management?

Measuring the success of your marketing efforts is important.

This is true whether we are talking about marketing campaigns that are delivered via traditional marketing channels or those that take advantage of the new media marketing channels that have risen as a result of the World Wide Web.

Given the fact that social media marketing is still fairly new, it may receive more scrutiny from senior management than your more traditional marketing efforts.

Different Ways to Measure ROI of Social Media Marketing Campaigns

Josh Bernoff, senior vice president of idea development at Forrester Research, wrote an interesting article on the ROI of social media marketing campaigns in the February 28, 2011 edition of the American Marketing Association’s Marketing News, titled “A Balanced Perspective on Social ROI.”

In the article, Bernoff points to the fact that there are many different ways to measure the success of your social media marketing efforts beyond the more obvious financial measures.

“For example, Secret deodorant wanted more women to hear about the benefits of its product,” writes Bernoff. “Instead of just advertising, Procter & Gamble and its agency, imc2, created a Facebook page about Lindsey Van, a female ski jumper who was unable to compete in the 2010 Winter Olympics because there is no women’s ski jumping category. By encouraging women to sign a petition on Lindsey’s behalf—and to persuade their friends to do the same—P&G attracted over 400,000 fans to the page.”

He goes on to mention that after the campaign, online surveys of Facebook users and Nielsen Brand Lift surveys revealed that there was an 8% increase in women who thought Secret had a better product than its competitors, and there was an 11% increase in purchase intent.

He also mentions that social media can save a brand a lot of money with risk-avoidance measures. That is, brands can use social media to respond to negative comments from customers that are posted online. It can also be used to debunk the inevitable urban legends that are spread via the various social media platforms.

Bernoff also points out that your brand’s social media efforts can have a positive effect on where your brand’s website appears in a search engine results page, increasing the likelihood that your brand will be found when your customers do a search on Google or any of the other search engines.

Furthermore, he mentions that financial returns aren’t limited to increases in sales. Your brand’s social media marketing efforts can also help decrease expenses, which will have a positive effect on your brand’s bottom line.

If you get a chance, read Josh Bernoff’s article; it has some very interesting insights.

Conclusion

In the current economy, brands need to do everything that they can to get consumers to purchase their products and services rather than choose those of their competitors.

As many brands know, social media marketing is becoming a more important, if not necessary, ingredient in the overall success of a brand.

However, as with all of your marketing efforts, the success of a social media marketing campaign needs to be measured in order to justify its value to senior management.

As Josh Bernoff’s article points out, there are many ways to measure the success of a social media marketing campaign beyond the more obvious short-term increases in sales.

This is something to consider when evaluating where to spend next year’s marketing budget.

Photo credit: Usraek on Flickr.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

More Posts

Copyright © chadjthiele.com
Every interaction with a consumer IS marketing.

Built on Notes Blog Core
Powered by WordPress