Category book review

Many Success Stories Actually Are Great Stories

Photo credit: Tom Ipri on Flickr.Throughout history, there have been many products that didn’t survive the Darwinian test.

But, those that have survived have helped launch careers and built companies.

Many of these companies have an interesting story to tell.

For example, did you know that some of the most beloved breakfast cereals can trace their history to the Battle Creek Sanitarium or that a housewife and mother of a seven-month-old child convinced her husband to launch one of the most successful baby food brands in the world? How about the fact that an unusually large order for milkshake-mixers led to the later success of one of the world’s most popular fast food restaurants or that the founder of one of America’s favorite fried chicken restaurants was really a colonel?

These and other stories are documented in the book,Symbols of America: A Lavish Celebration of America’s Best Loved Trademarks and the Products They Symbolize, Their History, Folklore, and Enduring Mystique,” by Hal Morgan.

Dr. John Harvey Kellogg and the Road to Wellville

In the 1890’s, Battle Creek was the headquarters of the Seventh Day Adventist Church. It was from their belief in vegetarianism and healthful eating that led to the inventions of some of world’s favorite breakfast cereals.

During this time, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, one of the Adventists’ staunchest supporters of healthful eating habits, ran the Battle Creek Sanitarium.

According to Morgan’s book, “Kellogg’s patients at the sanitarium lived on a diet of nuts and grains, often prepared from recipes created in the hospital’s experimental kitchen. Dr. Kellogg’s early food innovations included meat and butter substitutes such as Protose, Nuttose, and Nuttolene, as well as foods that have better stood the test of time, like granola, first made at the sanitarium in 1877. Patients were not allowed to drink tea or coffee, but received instead the home-brewed Caramel Coffee, made from bran, molasses, and burnt bread crusts.”

While Dr. Kellogg was more interested in promoting healthful eating, it was his brother, W.K. Kellogg, who saw the potential for a new business venture in the foods that were being made at the sanitarium. In particular, he focused on the flaked cereal that they had invented in 1894.

At first, the brothers started selling the cereal as Sanitas corn flakes to patients who had left the sanitarium and wanted to continue the healthy diet prescribed by Dr. Kellogg.

However, in 1903, W.K. Kellogg set out on his own to promote the cereal to a broader market. In the process, he changed the name to Kellogg’s toasted corn flakes and added malt, sugar and salt to improve the flavor—something his brother had opposed as unhealthy.

In 1906 W.K. Kellogg officially opened the Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company. Its name was later changed to The Kellogg Company and the rest is history.

On a side note, after his second nervous breakdown, C.W. Post found himself under the care of Dr. Kellogg at the Battle Creek Sanitarium. It was there that he was inspired to start his own breakfast cereal company, the Postum Cereal Company, now known as Post Holdings. Some of his early products included Postum Cereal beverage and, the better known, Grape Nuts cereal.

In 1993, T.C. Boyle wrote a novel, titled “The Road to Wellville,” that was later adapted into a movie in 1994.

The novel is a historical fictionalization of Dr. John Harvey Kellogg’s work at the Battlecreek Sanitarium.

The Birth of Gerber

Morgan’s book also explains the origins of the Gerber Products Company.

According to Morgan, “It took a mother to come up with the idea for commercially processed baby food—a mother with connections at the Fremont Canning Company, of Fremont, Michigan. Dorothy Gerber was straining peas for her seven-month-old daughter, Sally, one Sunday afternoon in 1927 when she asked her husband why the job couldn’t be done at his canning plant. “To press the point,” she recalled, “I dumped a whole container of peas into a strainer and bowl, placed them in Dan’s lap, and asked him to see how he’d like to do that three times a day, seven days a week.” The following day Dan dutifully asked his father if the baby’s vegetables couldn’t be strained at the cannery. Their tests proved it could be done, and by the fall of 1928 the first Gerber strained baby foods were on the market—carrots, peas, prunes, spinach, and vegetable soup.”

Conclusion

It is important to remember that even the largest brands in the world started out as fledgling companies founded on a hope and a dream.

As shown in the accounts of the origins of Kellogg’s and Post cereals, as well as the Gerber Products Company, many success stories are interesting stories. (Hint: This can be used in your content marketing efforts.)

As for the other two companies that I alluded to earlier, I’m sure that you guessed that I was referring to the McDonald’s and Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant chains. Their stories might be good topics for future posts.

However, if you don’t want to wait, you might want to pick up a copy of the book. It was published in 1987, but you can still purchase it on Amazon.com. You might also be able to find a copy at your local library.

It’s an interesting read; I’d recommend that you check it out.

Photo credit: Tom Ipri on Flickr.

Note: This post was originally published on HubPages in October of 2012. I removed it from HubPages in November of 2016.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

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The Value of a Good Book: Books I Have Read in the Last Year

Every April, I write a post that lists the books that I have read in the last year, along with the reviews that I posted about the books on Goodreads and Amazon.com.

This allows me to highlighting some good books. But, maybe more importantly, it serves as motivation to get at least one book read a month.

With summer just around the corner, this post might give you some ideas.

If you follow me on Goodreads, you already know the books that I have read. In that case, you can skip the rest of the post. If not, continue reading.

Books That I Have Read Recently

“The Big Moo: Stop Trying to Be Perfect and Start Being Remarkable” (affiliate link) by The Group of 33, Seth Godin. This book was written by Seth Godin and thirty-two of the world’s greatest thinkers. “The Group of 33,” as they call themselves, has written a book that is both informative and inspirational. The book was written in small blog-style chapters that can be read very quickly. I definitely suggest reading this book. And, the best part, 100% of the author royalties go to three great charities.

“Ogilvy on Advertising” (affiliate link) by David Ogilvy. Many people who work in marketing and advertising recommend reading this book. After reading it, I know why.

“Business Around a Lifestyle: How To Quit Your Job & Build The Life Of Your Dreams On The Internet (Volume 1)” (affiliate link) by Jim Kukral. Jim Kukral is a very smart guy. I have listened to some of his presentations in Webinars and podcasts. “Business Around a Lifestyle: How to Quit Your Job & Build the Life of Your Dreams on the Internet (Volume 1 – First Step: How to Dream Your Perfect Lifestyle, Then Go Get It!)” is a quick read that includes many examples of people who make a good living on the Internet. This is the first book in a three-part series. It sounds like the second and third books in the series will give more specific information and advice about how to make money on the Internet. That is the kind of information that I was looking for in this book. However, it was more of an introduction to the other two books. I look forward to reading the other two books in future.

“The Moneyless Man: A Year of Freeconomic Living” (affiliate link) by Mark Boyle. “The Moneyless Man: A Year of Freeconomic Living” is a very interesting book. Although I don’t agree with him about everything, he does make some good points and he tells a very interesting story. For example, I believe that capitalism and the use of money is a good thing, whereas the author tends to disagree. However, when he talks about using our natural resources more efficiently and the benefits of living a greener life, I completely agree with him. It never hurts to hear another person’s opinion. As he mentions at the end of the book, “None of us are teachers; we are all students, learning from each other’s experience. I hope you find something in mine. Take what you find useful and stick the rest in the recycling bin of ideas.” Well said. No matter what you believe, this book is worth reading.

“Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions” (affiliate link) by Guy Kawasaki. “Enchantment: The Art of Changing Hearts, Minds, and Actions” is filled with great advice. Guy Kawasaki not only offers insights based on his own experience, but he also points the reader to many other great books that offer a more in-depth analysis on each topic. I definitely recommend this book.

“Positioning: The Battle for Your Mind: How to Be Seen and Heard in the Overcrowded Marketplace” (affiliate link) by Al Ries and Jack Trout. In this book, the authors point out many of the flaws in the way that businesses approach the marketing of their products and services. They highlight the need for businesses to start with how consumers see their products and services and build from there, rather than assuming consumers will see things the way the company sees them. The authors also point out the importance of being first-to-market and that companies that are attempting to enter a market with an established leader should try to fill the needs of a niche market, rather than taking the market leader on head-to-head. This book was originally published in the 1980’s, but it is still very relevant today.

“No Bullshit Social Media: The All-Business, No-Hype Guide to Social Media Marketing” (affiliate link) by Jason Falls and Erik Deckers. If you are looking for suggestions on how to use social media for marketing purposes, I’d suggest picking up a copy of the book and giving it a read. It is filled with useful information and valuable case studies that reveal what has and hasn’t worked for other businesses in the past. And, that’s no bullshit.

“Killer Facebook Ads: Master Cutting-Edge Facebook Advertising Techniques” (affiliate link) by Marty Weintraub. Many people have criticized Facebook ads in recent months saying that they don’t work. I’d challenge them to read this book. I’d bet that they would learn a thing or two that might help them achieve their goals or at least figure out a goal that can be achieved by Facebook advertising. Marty Weintraub’s detailed explanation of Facebook ads covers everything from setting KPIs to launching the ad campaigns and analyzing the results. Weintraub has been in the marketing world for many years and it is clear that he knows what he is talking about when he talks about Facebook advertising. I’d definitely recommend reading this book if you are at all interested in advertising to consumers on Facebook.

“Brainfluence: 100 Ways to Persuade and Convince Consumers with Neuromarketing” (affiliate link) by Roger Dooley. “Brainfluence: 100 Ways to Persuade and Convince Consumers with Neuromarketing” by Roger Dooley is a very informative book. In the book, Dooley points out many academic studies that provide insight into the mind of the consumer and then he explains exactly how businesses can make use of the findings. This is another book that I would highly recommend to anyone.

“Symbols of America” (affiliate link) by Hal Morgan. “Symbols of America: A Lavish Celebration of America’s Best Loved Trademarks and the Products They Symbolize, Their History, Folklore, and Enduring Mystique,” by Hal Morgan is filled with interesting stories about some of the brands that have become a part of all of our lives. The information provided in this book reminds us that even the largest brands in the world started out as fledgling companies founded on a hope and a dream. There’s something in this book for everyone.

“Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear” (affiliate link) by Dr. Frank Luntz. I highly recommend “Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear” by Dr. Frank Luntz. Although the examples that he gives are taken from politics and business, there is something for everyone in this book. After all, we can all benefit by learning how to communicate more effectively, right? That is what this book is all about. In the book Luntz not only gives the 10 rules of effective language, but he also provides examples that illustrate their importance. Furthermore, his research provides insights on what to say and, maybe more important, what not to say. As the subtitle of the book states, “It’s not what you say, it’s what people hear.”

“Call of the Mall: The Geography of Shopping” (affiliate link) by Paco Underhill. I recommend “Call of the Mall: The Geography of Shopping by the Author of Why We Buy” by Paco Underhill to anyone who is interested in marketing, retail, merchandising, or shopping, in general. If you liked “Why We Buy,” you will want to read this book. Paco Underhill is one of my favorite authors. His books are filled with useful information and insights.

“Marketing in the Round: Multichannel Approaches in the Post-Social Media Era” (affiliate link) by Geoff Livingston and Gini Dietrich. The reality today is that marketers and PR pros have to work together to create a seamless experience for the customer. That means that people from many different communications disciplines need to work together in harmony. In order to achieve that, it helps if people know something about what the other people in the group do, and the pros and cons of each approach. This book helps provide that information in a format that not only makes this a good book to read from cover to cover, it will also be useful to have around to look things up on an as-needed basis.

“What Women Want: The Global Market Turns Female Friendly” (affiliate link) by Paco Underhill. This is another great book by Paco Underhill. In the book, Underhill explains how changing gender roles in society have influenced the way that we live, the way that we shop and the products that we buy. It is a great book for retailers, entrepreneurs, and businesspeople who work in all industries. As an added bonus, in this book, Underhill provides some early observations about how social media is influencing our day-to-day lives.

Final Thoughts

As I mentioned last year, your education doesn’t end when you receive your diploma. Therefore, a library card and a thirst for knowledge can go a long way in helping you gain additional insights and keep up with the latest trends in your industry.

That said, if you have some suggestions about books that you think I should add to my reading list, please feel free to offer suggestions below.

Also, feel free to connect on Goodreads.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

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Facebook Ads Can Be Highly Effective

Even before Facebook went public on May 18, 2012, people were questioning what value Facebook offered to the business community.

Since going public, Facebook has been under even more scrutiny.

In particular, people have questioned the effectiveness of Facebook advertising.

While many of the critiques have merit, particularly when you are looking at the revenue potential of Facebook, as a whole, that doesn’t mean that your business should ignore Facebook when you are trying to determine where to invest your adverting dollars.

In fact, when used correctly, Facebook advertising can be highly effective.

The question is: What do you need to do to effectively use Facebook to advertise your products or services?

Killer Facebook Ads

When looking to answer that question, a good place to start is with the CEO of aimClear, Marty Weintraub.

In his book, “Killer Facebook Ads: Master Cutting-Edge Facebook Advertising Techniques,” (affiliate link) Weintraub gives detailed advice that covers everything from setting KPIs to launching Facebook ad campaigns and analyzing the results. Examples are also provided to add clarity.

As he points out in the book, every step of the process is important if you want to set up a successful Facebook ad campaign.

Furthermore, Weintraub addresses some of the criticisms that people have when it comes to Facebook advertising.

For example, Weintraub states, “I can’t tell you how many times I’ve heard from people that Facebook ads don’t work…yet their landing page is terrible. If you care about conversion, landing pages can make Facebook ads look either really effective or really terrible.”

And, as to the concern that some marketers have about Facebook ads low click-through rates (CTR), Weintraub mentions, “In reality, not that many FB impressions result in clicks. It’s just that the impression count is so massive that even a very low CTR, as compared to search, can result droves of traffic.”

Conclusion

In an effort to meet the informational needs of investors, analysts have put Facebook under the microscope.

While Facebook advertising, in general, might not be as effective as other advertising techniques when certain KPIs are used to measure the success of the advertising campaign, that doesn’t mean that Facebook ads are a complete waste of time.

It might be the case that businesses haven’t learned how to align the way that their Facebook advertising campaigns are set up to their business goals or that the average business doesn’t take all the steps necessary to create a successful Facebook ad campaign.

If you want to get valuable insights on how to create successful Facebook advertising campaigns, you should start by tapping into the knowledge that Marty Weintraub has to offer.

The recommendations and advice that he gives in his book would take years to learn by yourself.

As I mentioned in the review of the book that I posted on Amazon.com, “Marty Knows Facebook Ads.”

Photo credit: dkalo on Flickr.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

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Social Media Marketing Is About Business… And, That’s No B.S.

By now, you have probably heard someone say that your business should be using social media to help market your products or services.

There is no doubt that the other decision-makers in your company have heard that, also.

There is a chance that they have decided to take a wait and see attitude or maybe they even rolled their eyes and decided that they didn’t believe the hype.

On the other hand, they may have decided to take the chance to see what they could accomplish by using social media as a marketing tool. In my opinion, that’s the smart decision.

No Bullshit Social Media

In their book “No Bullshit Social Media: The All-Business, No-Hype Guide to Social Media Marketing,” (affiliate link) Jason Falls and Erik Deckers explain that when used correctly, social media can be used to enhance branding and awareness, protect brand reputation, enhance public relations, build community, enhance customer service, facilitate research and development, and drive leads and sales. All of which will have an effect on your bottom line.

As they say, “When you add the word marketing to social media, it’s about business.”

Social Media Marketing Is Not Free

A lot of people think that social media marketing is free. This is not true.

Sure, it might be free to set up a Twitter account for your business and create a Facebook page, but you still have to pay someone to handle your social media marketing efforts, not to mention any other overhead costs that will be incurred (e.g., the costs of computers, electricity, etc.)

In fact, if your business uses social media to enhance customer service, your costs might actually increase.

This is not because it costs more to reach customers using social media. In fact, the opposite is usually true.

However, when you use social media to handle customer complaints, you might actually be able to reach unsatisfied customers who might not have made the effort to call or email your business to complain.

As Falls and Deckers suggest in their book, “Measure the total number of issues your customer service department handles as a whole. That includes phone and online issues. Has the number gone up because of the use of social media? Then that means a lot of those customer complaints were already out there, but you were able to identify them and solve the problem. It might mean you’re handling more issues on the whole, but it also means you’re increasing customer satisfaction.”

Final Thoughts

In my opinion, businesses that are taking a wait and see attitude or dismissing social media marketing altogether are definitely leaving money on the table.

As Jason Falls and Erik Deckers point out in their book, social media marketing can be used to help your business achieve many of its business goals. That is, if your business uses social media correctly.

If you are looking for suggestions on how to use social media for marketing purposes, I’d suggest picking up a copy of the book and giving it a read. It is filled with useful information and valuable case studies that reveal what has and hasn’t worked for other businesses in the past.

And, that’s no bullshit.

Photo credit: Tomas Fano on Flickr.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

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The Value of a Good Book: Insights From Will Hunting

“See, the sad thing about a guy like you is in 50 years you’re gonna staht doin some thinkin on your own and you’re gonna come up with the fact that there are two certainties in life. One, don’t do that. And two, you dropped a hundred and fifty grand on a f—-n education you coulda got for a dollah fifty in late charges at the public library.” ~ Will Hunting in Good Will Hunting (1997)

I think that Will Hunting made some interesting points in this scene in Good Will Hunting.

The first: Don’t be a jerk.

The second: There’s a lot of knowledge that can be gained if people just take the time to read the right books. And, thanks to public libraries, most of that knowledge is free.

Note: I think that if the movie script was written today, he might have said that the same education could be gained by doing a Google search, as there’s a lot of great information online that is available for free. But then again, you can access the Web at most public libraries, so the line in the movie still works.

Keep in mind, I don’t think that Matt Damon and Ben Affleck were arguing that people shouldn’t go to college.

Part of what you pay for when you go to college is the experience of college life. This includes getting the chance to interact with your professors and other students. In the process, you are able to get their perspectives on what you are studying.

Furthermore, I can honestly say that I am very proud to have earned a degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. That’s something that you can’t get by reading books at a library.

That said, your education doesn’t end when you receive your diploma. Therefore, a library card and a thirst for knowledge can go a long way in helping you gain additional insights and keep up with the latest trends in your industry.

Books That I Have Read Recently

I tend to get most of my information from blogs and articles online. However, I also try to supplement that knowledge with insights from thought leaders in the business world by reading books. (My goal is to read 12 books this year, in addition to everything that I read online.)

Here’s a list of some of the books that I have read in the last few years, along with the reviews that I wrote on my Reading List by Amazon on LinkedIn, if applicable.

“Twitter Power” (affiliate link) by Joel Comm.

“The Leap: A Memoir of Love and Madness in the Internet Gold Rush” (affiliate link) by Tom Ashbrook.

“Think Outside the Inbox: The B2B Marketing Automation Guide” (affiliate link) by David Cummings and Adam Blitzer. “I would recommend this book to marketers, sales professionals, and entrepreneurs who are looking for ways to improve their marketing and sales efforts. Furthermore, I would highly recommend this book to you if your business is thinking about investing in a marketing automation solution.”

“Enterprise Marketing Management: The New Science of Marketing” (affiliate link) by Dave Sutton and Tom Klein. “I would recommend this book to all marketers, including C-suite professionals. This book was published in 2003, but I think the concepts that are talked about in this book are still very relevant today.”

“Marketing in the Age of Google: Your Online Strategy IS Your Business Strategy” (affiliate link) by Vanessa Fox. “I would recommend this book to all marketers, including C-suite professionals. I would also recommend this book to entrepreneurs and just about anyone else who has a product or service for sale. This book not only explains how search engines can have an effect on online sales, it also gives examples of how search engine optimization (SEO), when done properly, can increase offline sales. It is filled with useful information that people can use in their professional lives and in their everyday lives as consumers. This is a great book.”

“The Dip: A Little Book That Teaches You When to Quit (and When to Stick)” (affiliate link) by Seth Godin. “This is the first book that I have read that was written by Seth Godin. I would classify it as a motivational or self-help book, rather than a book about marketing. Overall, though, I thought it was a very interesting book and I would recommend it to anyone.”

“Confessions of an Advertising Man” (affiliate link) by David Ogilvy and Sir Alan Parker. “This book is a classic.”

“The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference” (affiliate link) by Malcolm Gladwell. “‘The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference’ by Malcolm Gladwell is a very well written book. It definitely makes you think. I look forward to reading his other books.”

“Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking” (affiliate link) by Malcolm Gladwell. “‘Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking’ is another thought-provoking book by Malcolm Gladwell. I would definitely recommend it to anyone.”

“Gen BuY: How Tweens, Teens and Twenty-Somethings Are Revolutionizing Retail” (affiliate link) by Kit Yarrow and Jayne O’Donnell. “‘Gen BuY: How Tweens, Teens and Twenty-Somethings Are Revolutionizing Retail’ is a very informative book. I would definitely recommend it to any businessperson who has a product or service that is being sold to Gen-Y customers. I also recommend it to any person who wants to learn how companies are using technology to market to potential customers. Furthermore, the authors of the book list many cool websites and apps, making it a useful book for consumers of all ages (especially parents with Gen-Y children.)”

“Social Media 101: Tactics and Tips to Develop Your Business Online” (affiliate link) by Chris Brogan. “‘Social Media 101: Tactics and Tips to Develop Your Business Online’ by Chris Brogan is the perfect book for new bloggers. It is also a great book for businesses that are looking to add social media into their marketing mix.”

“Crush It!: Why NOW Is the Time to Cash In on Your Passion” (affiliate link) by Gary Vaynerchuk. “‘CRUSH IT! Why NOW Is the Time to Cash In on Your Passion’ by Gary Vaynerchuk is a great book. I would recommend it to anyone who doesn’t understand why they need to include social media in their marketing mix (or anyone else, for that matter.)”

“The Thank You Economy” (affiliate link) by Gary Vaynerchuk. “‘The Thank You Economy’ is another great book by Gary Vaynerchuk. I would recommend it to any businessperson. I particularly like the ping-pong analogy that he uses to explain the importance of combining social media with your traditional marketing efforts. This book is packed with great case studies that showcase successful and not-so-successful uses of social media in the business world.”

“The Big Red Fez: How To Make Any Web Site Better” (affiliate link) by Seth Godin “‘The Big Red Fez: How To Make Any Web Site Better’ by Seth Godin is a book that can be read very quickly, yet it has a lot of useful information in it.”

“Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping–Updated and Revised for the Internet, the Global Consumer, and Beyond” (affiliate link) by Paco Underhill. “‘Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping–Updated and Revised for the Internet, the Global Consumer, and Beyond’ by Paco Underhill is one of the most informative and entertaining business books that I have read recently. Almost every other page has some insight that makes you think: “that’s interesting” or “that’s good to know.” I’d recommend this book to anyone.”

“The Amazing Story of Quantum Mechanics: A Math-Free Exploration of the Science that Made Our World” (affiliate link) by James Kakalios. “‘The Amazing Story of Quantum Mechanics: A Math-Free Exploration of the Science that Made Our World’ by James Kakalios is a very interesting read if you want to learn about the science behind some of products that we use in our everyday lives. I’m not a science guy, but I still thought it was a very good book.”

“Trust Agents: Using the Web to Build Influence, Improve Reputation, and Earn Trust” (affiliate link) by Chris Brogan and Julien Smith. “There’s not much that I can say that hasn’t already been said about this book. If you haven’t read it, I suggest that you add it to your reading list.”

“Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?” (affiliate link) by Seth Godin. “‘Linchpin: Are You Indispensable?’ by Seth Godin is a book that everyone should read. If you have ever doubted yourself or chose the easy road instead of following your dream, this book explains why. And, it challenges you to change that. Do yourself a favor and read this book.”

“Go Mobile: Location-Based Marketing, Apps, Mobile Optimized Ad Campaigns, 2D Codes and Other Mobile Strategies to Grow Your Business” (affiliate link) by Jeanne Hopkins and Jamie Turner. “I would recommend this book to marketers and entrepreneurs, particularly those who work for businesses that advertise online. (And, that should be almost every business.) As the authors of the book point out, “Your web-based marketing channel could very quickly transform into just mobile marketing.” This book explains some of the differences between PC-based online marketing and mobile marketing. In the process, it provides insights that can help give a business the edge over its competition.”

Final Thoughts

In “Trust Agents: Using the Web to Build Influence, Improve Reputation, and Earn Trust,” Chris Brogan and Julien Smith write about how they read as much as they can online. As they point out, “It’s easier to read too much and forget the stuff that doesn’t matter than to wonder what you’re missing.” This quote can apply to books, as well.

Furthermore, even with all the knowledge that can be found online, there’s a lot of information that authors choose to share only in the books that they publish. Therefore, it pays to pick up a book and read.

So what are you waiting for?

Photo credit: kit.macallister on Flickr.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

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Useful Insight From “Why We Buy”

Photo credit: mastermaq on Flickr.Recently, I finished reading “Why We Buy: The Science of Shopping—Updated and Revised for the Internet, the Global Consumer, and Beyond,” (affiliate link) by Paco Underhill.

In my review of the book on Amazon.com and other various websites, I mention that the book is “one of the most informative and entertaining business books that I have read recently.”

And, I really mean it.

Almost every other page has some insight that makes you think: “that’s interesting” or “that’s good to know.”

It’s definitely one of those books that will inspire many future blog posts.

In fact, if you read my last blog post, titled “The Business Decision: Unintended Consequences,” you will remember that I have already cited this book to point out that every business decision that you make has an effect on other areas of your business and, in the end, influences your bottom line.

As Underhill points out in the book, the decisions that consumers make each day can also have an effect on your bottom line in more ways than a person might think.

All Other Businesses Are Your Competition

When you make a business decision, you are deciding how you will use your business’s finite resources.

The concept of competing for finite resources can also be applied to our personal lives, as well.

As Underhill points out, “It is dangerously narrow-minded for a store owner to believe that the only competition is from others in his or her category. In truth, retailers compete with every other demand on consumer time and money. Recently we’ve been hired to study patrons in movie theaters, which just reminds us that two hours and $20 spent in a cinema are forever lost to the rest of retailing. Likewise, if the experience of spending twenty minutes of unused lunch hour browsing in a computer store is more enjoyable than visiting a bookstore, then it becomes likely that some software will be sold—and impossible that a book will be.”

I think that paragraph alone could change the way some businesses approach their marketing decisions.

In fact, it could completely alter the way some businesses approach every business decision that they make.

It also makes you think about how everything we as humans do each day has an impact on other areas of our lives and the lives of the people who we interact with (and the people who they interact with, etc.)

Conclusion

This is just one of the things that Paco Underhill points out in this book that I found very interesting.

In the future, I plan to explore the concept further.

For now, I just wanted to use it to illustrate why I reviewed the book the way that I did.

As I said in my review, I would recommend the book to anyone.

Photo credit: mastermaq on Flickr.

Chad Thiele

Marketing analyst and strategist, content curator, applied sociologist, proud UW-Madison alumnus, and an Auburn-trained mobile marketer. My goal is to help businesses identify trends that will help them achieve their marketing objectives and business goals. I'm currently looking for my next career challenge. Please feel free to contact me anytime at: chadjthiele@gmail.com.

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